Pictorial Atlas of Acupuncture

Pictorial Atlas of Acupuncture

An Illustrated Manual of Acupuncture Points
Author: , , ,
Language: English
Layout: 1300 illustrations, four-color throughout, hardcover with jacket
Pages: 352
Size: 19,2 x 24 cm/9,5 x 7,5 inches

Price: 14,95 €
14,99 £
29,99 $


ISBN: 978-3-8480-0236-8
Acupuncture in Latin means “sticking with the needle.” Each of the 409 important acupuncture points is presented with an anatomical graphic, an overview of the meridian and a photo showing the needle placement. The combination of Chinese sources and the authors’ therapeutic experiences provides a sensible balance between the most important indications and practical needs. The names, properties, and applications of the individual acupuncture points have been revised on this basis. Far-Eastern healing methods and Western observation techniques create a bridge between Asian and Western views of acupuncture. The Pictorial Atlas of Acupuncture not only provides beginners with an overview of the most important acupuncture points, but experienced practitioners can also learn about seldom used acupuncture points and thus extend their knowledge.

Table of Contents

The basic principles
Acupuncture measurements
Finger measurements
Thumb measurement
Middle-finger measurement
Cross-finger measurement
Body measurements
Acupuncture Techniques
Positioning the patient
Needling Techniques
Basic position
Needling in taut skin
Needling using nail pressure
Needling with a guiding hand
Needling using guiding tubes
Needling into pinched skin
Depth of needling
Direction of needling
Perpendicular needling
Oblique needling
Transverse needling
The Qi sensation
Needle stimulation
Rotating the needle
Lifting and depressing the needle
Using breathing
Further techniques
Acupuncture needles

Channels and points
Point Characteristics
Location and depth of needling
Channel pathways
Point categories
Back-Shu-points
Mu (gathering) points
Qi-source-points
Connecting points
Confluent points
The five Shu-points
Jing (well) points
Xing (spring) points
Shu (stream) points
Jing (river) points
He (sea) points
Lower He (sea) points
Cleft (Xi) points
Meeting (master) points
The principal acupuncture points
The Acupuncture Points of the Principal Channels
The lung channel (Lu)
The channel pathway
The Lu 1–Lu 11 points
The large intestine channel (LI)
The channel pathway
The LI 1–LI 20 points
The stomach channel (St)
The channel pathway
The St 1–St 45 points
The spleen channel (Sp)
The channel pathway
The Sp 1–Sp 21 points
The heart channel (He)
The channel pathway
The He 1–He 9 points
The small intestine channel (SI)
The channel pathway
The SI 1–SI 19 points
The bladder channel (Bl)
The channel pathway
The Bl 1–Bl 67 points
The kidney channel (Ki)
The channel pathway
The Ki 1–Ki 27 points
The pericardium channel (P)
The channel pathway
The P 1–P 9 points
The San Jiao channel (SJ)
The channel pathway
The SJ 1–SJ 23 points
The gall bladder channel (GB)
The channel pathway
The GB 1–GB 44 points
The liver channel (Lv)
The channel pathway
The Lv 1–Lv 14 points

The Points of the Extraordinary Vessels Du Mai and Ren Mai
The Du Mai (Du)
The channel pathway
The Du 1–Du 28 points
The Ren Mai (Ren)
The channel pathway
The Ren 1–Ren 24 points

Further Acupuncture Points (Extraordinary Points)
Extraordinary points on the head and neck (Ex-HN)
Location
The Ex-HN 1–Ex-HN 15 points
Extraordinary points on the chest and abdomen (Ex-CA)
Location
The Ex-CA 1 point
Extraordinary points on the back (Ex-B)
Location
The Ex-B 1–Ex-B 9 points
Extraordinary points on the arm and hand (Ex-AH)
Location
The Ex-AH 1–Ex-AH 11 points
Extraordinary points on the leg and foot (Ex-LF)
Location
The Ex-LF 1–Ex-LF 12 points

Appendix
Nomenclature
Reference works and recommended reading
Photographic credits
Index
Needle material used
Editors
Authors

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